Renske : ‘ Conducting field research in a foreign country with international students was a great way to gain hands-on experience in an international setting’

November 21st, 2017

Renske did her summer internship project at the Elizabeth Center in Tanzania. This is a summer research programme to investigate what is the role of an NGO in relation to local economic development. She decided to do an internship because she think it would be a very valuable experience for her future career. And  this international character of the internship really appealed to her.

Renske: ” The internship in Tanzania was a great experience where I learned a lot and which was fun at the same time “

Why did you choose to do an internship?

Conducting field research in a foreign country with international students was a great way to gain hands-on experience in an international setting. It is not only about an internship in a foreign country, you also conduct research together with students from different nationalities.

What pitfalls did you met?

It was very interesting to conduct research in a country with a different culture. The Tanzanians have their own manners, customs and practices with which I was not familiar. We had to adjust to the situation and become familiar with their approach to situations. It was not always easy to provide the teachers, the Sisters and other locals with recommendations because their way of working is different than we are used to.

What tip do you have for students willing to do an internship?

Most children and staff at the school spoke the English language very well which made it easy to communicate with them. However, the local people in the village did not master the English language. If we wanted to talk to locals to investigate the local situation, we made sure that someone was able to translate for us. Also, the staff at the Center taught us some Tanzanian words which was fun and handy at the same time.

 

What did you like about doing an internship?

The internship in Tanzania was a great experience where I learned a lot and which was fun at the same time! I can really recommend the internship to students who want to gain hands-on experience in an international setting.

 

 

Max: “GRIP learned me to look at the business environment from different perspectives, which is a valuable skill”

November 21st, 2017

Before starting his master’s degree in International Economics & Business in September, Max did a 6-week internship during the summer of 2017 at the National Institute of Securities Markets (NISM) in Mumbai, India. This was a part of the Global Research Internship Program (GRIP) to work on a research project looking at financial literacy and financial inclusion. 

 

Max: ” In addition to doing research in a team, we went on some interesting field trips.”

 

Why did you do an internship with GRIP?

The GRIP truly is a unique package. The programme provides you the opportunity to do research in a global team with students from various partner universities in a completely different environment, which adds to your international experience. In the end, I chose to apply for an internship at NISM in India, because the research topics covered highly relevant issues for India’s financial system. I also wanted to learn more about the Indian culture and see the country, which is possible since you have time to travel after the internship.

How did you find this internship?

I found GRIP when scrolling through the RUG-site. When I saw the advertisement of doing a research internship abroad during the summer, I started looking for a company, project, and country that excited me. After applying for the internship via a first round of a motivation letter, resume and grade transcripts, I was invited for a skype interview with Newcastle University. In a few days already I could start the application process for a visa and book my flights!

What did you like about doing an internship?

What I liked about the internship at NISM was the diversity of activities. In addition to doing research in a team, we went on some interesting field trips. NISM organized company visits to some of the country’s most important financial institutions, such as the Reserve Bank of India (the country’s Central Bank), the NSE (stock exchange), and the Securities and Exchange Board (regulator of securities markets). Also, together with some researchers, we were allowed to attend the SBI Banking and Economics conclave: a chance to learn from panel discussions between business leaders in the financial services industry, leading economists, and politicians about India’s main economic and financial issues. Furthermore, NISM organized sessions in their trading simulation lab, where we attempted to trade profitably in a simulation linked to the real stock exchange.

What did you learn from your internship?

I learned a lot from my time at NISM, especially since it’s not a regular internship. The environment you work in is a cluster of different cultures, which makes it interesting, but also requires a flexible attitude. Indian people, for example, have completely different ways of interacting, such that you have to be adaptive. This definitely learns you to better deal with these kinds of situations in an international environment, and helps you to better overcome cultural barriers. Also, GRIP learned me look at the business environment from different perspectives, which is a valuable skill. The company visits and conference all gave interesting insights into different aspects of the Indian economy, such as the monetary system, stock markets, labour markets etc. which broadens your view.

Do you think that the internship prepared you for the labour market?

My time in India definitely prepared me for the labour market. The international experience you obtain can always be applied wherever you end up working, and is surely useful if you’re looking to work in an international environment. The internship also gave me insight into the workings of a key player in the global economy, which is useful for both the master’s degree in international economics and valuable for a future employer.  

 To conclude, the internship has been extremely valuable and fun. Not only did I improve my research skills and intercultural competencies, but I also had a great time travelling the country with my fellow interns. I would definitely recommend you to apply for GRIP!

Layla and Elke:‘living and working in a totally different culture under totally different conditions was a very interesting experience’

November 21st, 2017

In the summer of 2017 Layla Menge and Elke Veenman did a summer research internship project in  Nicaragua in a small city called San Carlos. The project was organized by the University of Groningen, the City Link Groningen-San Carlos and a local NGO called ASODELCO. Layla graduated in the Bachelor “International Business” and Elke graduated in the masters “Change Management” and “International Business and Management”.

Layla and Elke: “It was an amazing and challenging experience to work in one of the poorest countries of Latin America! We learned a lot from the cultural differences and managing our own project. ”

Why did you choose to do a research internship in Nicaragua?

We were immediately enthusiastic when we saw the research internship in Nicaragua, because of the Latin American culture and the Spanish language. We really wanted to improve our Spanish and this project would give us the opportunity to live and work in a Spanish speaking country! Furthermore, the project was about microcredits for women and local development. Layla did an exhange semester in Peru and became very interested in (the economic developoment and politics of) Latin America. She has an interest for local economic development and emerging markets. Elke was during the application of the research internship, doing an internship in Groningen about financing start-ups, which she enjoyed a lot, so the topic of micro-financing for women triggered me enormously.

What did you like about doing an internship abroad?

First of all, living and working in a totally different culture under totally different conditions was a very interesting experience. Nicaragua is the second poorest country of Latin America, so we had to deal with no or few running water: taking a shower with a bucket of water and only cold water was available. Furthermore, it was hard to see that people were struggling to obtain normal living conditions, such as water, food and a well isolated house. Luckily we lived in normal houses, with water, food and wifi, but the things we saw did open our eyes and made us think of how lucky we are in The Netherlands.

The content of the project was very interesting and we had the chance to speak with different women and see different small businesses. The way of working in Nicaragua is very different from working in an internship in the Netherlands. We had to ask many questions in order to understand what exactly was expected from us and how we could come in contact with the different businesses. It improved our skills of being patient and asking the right questions to receive the right information to complete the work we had in mind.

What tip do you have for students willing to do an internship comparable with the one you did?

Make sure your level of Spanish is sufficient! Nobody will speak English and you have to work in Spanish, which means you need to know well how to communicate in the language. Additionally, prepare yourself in the Netherlands for the project and have in mind what you want to do there. We recommend to read for example about microfinance, economic development and the Nicaraguan history/culture. Hence, the substantive preparation of the project will give you more time in Nicargua to do the field work. This internship is only 4 weeks, so it is better that you can start immediately after arrive. Lastly, it is an amazing country to travel, so we recommend you to travel in Nicaragua before or after your project.

What did you learn from your internship?

Firstly, we gained valuable work experience in an international environment which improved our intercultural communication skills. Hence, we learned much from working and living in a developing country by seeing that things go very different. For example, the way of doing business is very different than what we learned in University. However, this does not mean that the Nicaraguan way of working/doing business is worse than the way we´re used to in the Netherlands. Finally, we improved our research skills.

What pitfalls did you met?

It was hard to work in Spanish, even though our level of Spanish was A2/B1 when we arrived. It is different to just travel in a foreign new language, then to work in a new language. Hence, it can be frustrating that things go different than planned or expected or that things take longer.

What did you learn from working in an international team?

Working in an international team is very good for opening up your way of thinking. As Dutch people, we always think we need to be effective and efficient, but that was not always possible in the conditions of Nicaragua. Surprisingly, it was really easy and quick to arrange people for a meeting or to make an appointment with a person and her business. In the Netherlands you have to plan things way in advance, in Nicaragua things can be arranged on the spot. In the Netherlands you have your goal in mind and you can directly start to work to get it done. In Nicaragua it takes more time to make everybody understand what is the goal, what needs to be done and how it needs to be done. We were lucky to have a good mix of people to work together and we could learn from each other.

Did you succeed in linking theory to practice?

We read about micro financing, social economic development and what we experienced in Nicaragua was in line with the theory. Micro financing programs help in a short term a family or a some persons, but it does not always have potential to grow or make big money for a person. However, for individuals it can be an important way to improve their living conditions and increase opportunities. Furthermore, we put our research skills into practice. However, since the period was short we did not have the time to do an extensice research and really learn much more. Hence, the theory we learned during our studies about intercultural communication and emerging markets was very useful. However we could not put most of the theory about international business into practice because the businesses are very small and in a starting phase. To sum it all up, we learned more from the international working experience in a developing country than that we were really challenged to put theory into practice.

Do you think that the internship prepared you for the labour market?

We were able to experience how it is to work in Nicaragua . Especially for jobs in finance/economic development or in business in emerging/developing markets it will be a valuable experience. We believe that this experience shows future employers that we are able to adapt to another culture, work environment and that we can work with people from different backgrounds.

Movie on Youtube of our internship in San Carlos:

 

 

Janny: ‘It is the perfect way to gain practical experience, … and to discover the paths of your career ’

November 21st, 2017

Janny participated in an internship at REOD Consultancy Ltd., under the platform of Idego in Kigali, Rwanda. Together with Zack Millar from the University of Newcastle and their Rwandan colleagues to conduct a feasibility study for a client who wanted to start a business in the clothing industry. After approving the feasibility of this project, they wrote a business plan including projected financial statements and presented this to the client. In the end of the internship they advised REOD about how to grow and professionalise a consultancy business.

Janny:”I enjoyed the most was to work in a completely different setting, and to generate quick results with a diverse and dedicated team”

Why did you choose to do an internship?

Since I started the MSc. IB&M programme when I was only 20 years old, I felt that I could use more work and travel experiences before starting my career. Therefore, I decided to extend the programme by one year and to seize all opportunities that would come my way. Now, while I am looking back at what I’ve learned during two international internships and a part-time board position, I believe this was one of the best decisions I took in my life.

What did you like about doing an internship?

What I enjoyed the most was to work in a completely different setting, and to generate quick results with a diverse and dedicated team. I also really liked to share experiences about the different projects we were involved in with the other interns from Newcastle and Groningen. A real highlight of my time in Rwanda was that we were, quite randomly, invited to the Youth Connekt Africa Summit. This summit took place in an unexpectedly modern convention centre in Kigali, with speakers Jack Ma (founder of Alibaba Group), rapper Akon and Paul Kagame (President of Rwanda).

How did you find/get the internship?

I saw an announcement on Nestor about the Global Research Internship Programme (GRIP) and applied by sending my CV and cover letter to the Careers Company.

What tip do you have for students willing to do an internship?

Do not hesitate any longer, and apply for an internship! It is the perfect way to gain practical experience, to think about the topic of your master thesis and to discover the paths you want to take in the beginning of your career. And, most importantly, it is a great way to spend your summer!

 

 

 

Elisa: “One of the most valuable parts … was how it linked all the academic knowledge I had gained to real life economic challenges.”

November 21st, 2017

Elisa did her GRIP internship in the North East region of the United Kingdom. This internship dealt with promoting local small and medium sized businesses in the high-tech sector. During the internship she gained valuable work experience in her field about firm behaviour and regional economic development what she learnt in the RUG. 

Elisa:” This internship offers a view into the making of local economic policy.”

What did you learn from your internship?

The project I was involved in was given to us, an international team of mostly undergraduate students, to execute under minimal supervision. Our supervisor was extremely nice and also gave us great freedom in deciding what we wanted to focus on in the research. As the most senior member of my team, I quickly realized I should make use of my previous experience to ensure we would deliver solid results, including the identification of local challenges and recommendations designed to address those issues, at the end of the three-week stay. The most valuable lesson for me was learning to organise and manage a team where each of us had different home countries, first languages, and academic backgrounds. With a team as diverse as ours and with the available time frame being so short, it was essential that we found and made use of the strengths of each student and had a common vision of what the end result would look like. I learned to facilitate communication within the group, delegate tasks, and to encourage and motivate others to put their best foot forward.

What pitfalls did you meet?

The biggest opportunity and challenge for us as a team was the degree of freedom given to us in delivering the project outcome; we were given the chance to decide the focus of our research, who we would interview and when, and what kind of recommendations we would give to our host organisation to help solve the identified issues. Group work can be demanding anywhere, not to mention in a foreign country and with half of your group members speaking a different language. I also came to realise that the project was in fact quite demanding because we were dealing with complex governance and policy issues. My most important tips for success are then to really listen to your team members and find out what they are good at, to lead by example and being prepared to work extra, being patient, and doing your homework on the question at hand as thoroughly as you can.

What was your biggest blooper?

My biggest blooper was in the interview phase of applying for the internship. I had a deadline for a course assignment right before my Skype interview with Newcastle University, and had planned to prepare after I handed in the assignment. It took me longer to finish than I had expected, and as a result I went to the interview with only a little knowledge about the contents of the internship, which is never ideal. The lesson here is, always do your homework on time before a job interview!

How did you manage in a foreign country when you didn’t speak the language?

Luckily I did not have too much language difficulties doing my internship in the United Kingdom. Sometimes the locals we interviewed had a quite strong dialect, which made especially phone interviews challenging. We then made use of our team member who was originally from Newcastle and let him lead the interviews while the rest of us mostly listened the conversation with the phone on speaker. In general, we made sure to work together as a team to overcome any shortcomings in language skills.

 

 

Azra: ‘It did teach me some essential skills for the labor market and for interacting with colleagues from different national and cultural backgrounds’

October 2nd, 2017

Azra Leona Keller did a summer internship at KatalystM in Singapore between her Pre-MSc International Business and Management (IBM) and her MSc IB&M. Her task was to support client account teams and work on an internal project. The internship was empowered by the Singapore Alumni Chapter and the Careers Company of the Faculty of Economics and Business of the University of Groningen.

Azra: “Be curious, engage with your colleagues, and never be shy to ask”

Why did you choose to do an internship?

I chose to apply to the Summer Internship opportunities because I was looking to do something a little bit more challenging during the summer break. Also, I really wanted to gain some practical experience before starting my master’s and to explore the options in marketing, which is one of the areas I can focus on during my master studies. The position at KatalystM was a perfect fit to learn more about digital marketing and to spend some time abroad during the summer!

What did you learn from your internship?

During my internship I got the chance to learn more about digital marketing – an area I had previously very little knowledge about. This was a great experience to learn something new, to support the team, and to work on an internal project I had been assigned to. This way, I also got to know some of the clients of the company, and additionally learned about some of the programs and tools that are commonly used to work on campaigns, or analyze performance.

Do you think that the internship prepared you for the labour market?

Because the summer break only allows for a short internship of 8 weeks, the work was often more task oriented, and did not allow to gain a lot of experience in taking over more responsibility. However, it did teach me some essential skills for the labor market. Most notably, I learned how to interact with colleagues from different national and cultural backgrounds, and to work in a team, as well as independently!

What tip do you have for students willing to do an internship?

Be curious, engage with your colleagues, and never be shy to ask – showing interest in your co-workers, their work and the local culture will help you to get along well and to gain great work experience! And, at least in Singapore, they will tell you about all the great food places – you don’t want to miss out on those!

Marieke: “I would definitely recommend everyone to look for either an internship or something ‘different’ to do over the summer!”

September 28th, 2017

Marieke Zwaan did a summer internship at Synechron Business Consulting in Singapore. She studied ‘Honours Master Program in Leadership’ and the ‘Master Strategic Innovation Management’. The internship was powered by the Singapore Alumni Chapter and the Careers Company of the Faculty of Economics and Business of the University of Groningen.

Marieke: “I learned a lot about the Asian culture, but also a lot about myself and how I handle those differences”

Why an internship?

After studying for years and getting extra-curricular experience by doing board years and committees I decided that it was time for some practical experience related to my studies and future career. I started looking for an internship for the summer period to prevent further delay in my studies and came across the summer internships in Singapore. When I looked into it, it sounded like the perfect opportunity to combine an internship with traveling. Also, it was a way to get more out of my comfort zone than an internship in the Netherlands would have gotten me.

Can you tell something about the company?

I applied for the internship at Synechron Business Consulting. It is a consultancy branch of a huge worldwide company, which focuses on the financial sector and has a digital and technology branch as well. This company appealed to me because I was still very much in doubt whether I would like to work in consultancy and because the company is constantly working on new innovative solutions in banking. I found this opportunity very interesting considering my background as a student of the Master Strategic Innovation Management. Long story short; I got the internship, found the tiniest room I’ve ever seen (Singapore is one of the most expensive countries in the world!) and moved to Singapore in end of June.

What did you do?

Even though my tasks at the company were not very challenging (I did an internal project, which did not take up that much time), I did enjoy being part of a very enthusiastic and dedicated team with a diverse background. Working was also very different from studying abroad, because you spend most of your time with your colleagues at the office and you really should get out there after working hours to make friends with whom you can hang out. Whenever I could I tried to walk around Singapore and find new interesting spots (I was the weird Dutchie that actually walked everywhere despite the heat) or I traveled to one of the many countries that are very easy to reach from Changi airport.

What did you learn?

I learned a lot about the Asian culture while I was in Singapore, but also a lot about myself and how I handle those differences. I made new friends, visited a lot of new countries and even got a little bit of a tan, so overall I had a great experience. Oh, and I should not forget to tell you about the food, it was amazing! This internship was a great way to spend my summer and I would definitely recommend it to everyone looking for either an internship or something “different” to do over the summer!

Ruben: “To get me out of my comfort zone I decided to do an internship abroad”

February 8th, 2017

Ruben Lautenbag did an  internship at FrieslandCampina in Singapore from November 2016 till January 2017 during his study MSc Marketing Management. He finished his MSc Organizational & Management Control at the University of Groningen in 2015. 

Ruben: “I would really suggest everybody to join a local sports team or to engage in other activities where you can meet new people.”

Why an internship?

“Actually I was not planning to do an internship during my degree. However, when I found out that I had to complete 65 ECTS in one year to get my third master degree, I decided to stick to two degrees. The result was, however, that I was left with a year with only 35 ECTS. As I am not the type of person to lean back, I decided that I wanted to do something useful to fill up this gap. I considered to become part of a committee at a study association or to do extra courses, but I realized that those things would not really get me out of my comfort zone as I already went through them. So I decided to do an internship abroad.”

How did you find the internship?

“When I made the decision that I wanted to do this, the search process started. This was of course a great challenge, especially given the fact that I was looking for an internship for maximum 3 months. Therefore I focused on companies of which I knew that they hired interns for a relatively short period before. I contacted a lot of organizations as well as intermediary agencies and eventually I ended up with an amazing assignment at FrieslandCampina in Singapore. How? I checked the companies that participated in the Work Experience Programme last summer and searched for employees who graduated at the University of Groningen and tried to contact them. Finally, the alumni officer of the Careers Company helped me to connect with one of them. Given the fact that it is not easy to find an international internship, I would advise to search for internships via as many channels as possible. Don’t focus on one or two organizations and wait for their reaction, but try to approach as many as you can.”

What did you do?

“In November it was time for my departure and soon after my arrival, Singapore really felt like home. I had a very nice assignment and the people at FrieslandCampina were also very nice. I also joined a Dutch expat soccer team and thereby directly met a lot of new friends. Unlike as an exchange student, where you directly become part of the (exchange) student community, as an intern you are relatively on your own. Therefore I would really suggest everybody to join a local sports team or to engage in other activities where you can meet new people. Besides your work it is also important to enjoy the country and the region. Although your work is of course your first priority, do not hesitate to travel around, especially during the weekends and holidays.”

Some final tips?

“Also be prepared that not everything will go according to plan. At some point you will pay too much for something, your phone will break down, or you might simply miss home. However, don’t be put off too much by things like these, it’s just part of the game. Lastly, I really enjoyed my time in Singapore. Although it sounds like a terrible cliché, I really met a lot of nice people and learned a lot, so I would advise everybody to do an (international) internship!”

Karel: “I really enjoyed the freedom that we were given to do our research and the guidance by NISM”

November 25th, 2016

Karel Hruby did an internship in India in the summer of 2016 during his Master in Finance at the RUG. Karl is from the Czech Republic. The internship at NISM in Mumbai was part of the Global Research Internship Program (GRIP), a cooperation between the Careers Company and the University of New Castle.
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Karl:  “I am very thankful for being able to use the data we were provided by NISM for my Master Thesis”.

Why did you choose to do an internship?

When I read about the opportunities offered by the FEB Careers Company, the internship at NISM in Mumbai drew my attention for two main reasons: Firstly, I have always wanted to travel to India and secondly, because I study finance and NISM is an educational institute in securities markets. Of course among other reasons was the idea to differentiate my CV and learn more about this exciting country.

What did you like about doing an internship?

In our work time I really enjoyed the freedom that we were given by the institute to do our research and the guidance we were provided by NISM. Also, in my free time it was great to stroll through the streets of Mumbai, interact with the locals and try local food.

What tip do you have for students willing to do an internship?

A general tip from my side would be: try to be open-minded and patient from the beginning. Most of the daily things work differently in India than you are used to. That way you will enjoy it. Moreover, the NISM internship is more suitable for Bachelor students, rather than Master students.

How did you find/get the internship?

I found out about this internship via an e-mail that I received from the FEB Careers Company. Then things went quite fast: I applied, had a Skype interview with the Newcastle University and got accepted.

What did you learn from your internship?

It would be a long list of things that I learned and took with me from India. I saw what an Indian office environment looks like. I learned about financial literacy in India (which was the main topic of the project). Mostly, I am very thankful for being able to use the data we were provided by NISM for my Master Thesis which I am working on currently.

How did you manage in a foreign country when you didn’t speak the language?

This is not a big problem in India because English unites India (in addition to Hindi). Therefore, I never had any big problems communicating with people. Of course, you will need to interact for example with rickshaw drivers, who only speak basic English. However, you will learn how to do that very quickly.

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Chantalle: “I have definitely learned to be more assertive”

November 25th, 2016

Chantalle van Zanten did an internship in India during the summer of 2016 (end of June till the beginning of August). The internship at Tata Medical Centre in Kolkata  was part of the Global Research Internship Program (GRIP), a cooperation between the Careers Company and the University of New Castle. After the internship she started with her Master thesis as part of her MSc International Business & Management (IB&M) at the RUG.

GRIP Chantalle van Zanten

Chantalle: “Enjoy it and ask people around you for help”

Why did you participate in GRIP?

When I saw the description of this project, I was immediately enthusiastic. Besides my MSc IB&M, I am also obtaining a certificate in Healthcare Management. The project was therefore a perfect fit between two main interests of mine, namely international companies and healthcare. Furthermore, I had never been to India and I did not want to pass on the opportunity to see and learn about this fascinating country and its culture.

What did you like about doing an internship and what have you learned?

Our project was about a performance status system called ECOG PS. The system was used world wide. We had to interview doctors and nurses on their views of the ECOG system. I liked that it was a challenging internship because it was not easy to catch doctors and to have them cooperate, which was due to the fact that they were very busy.
Furthermore, we had to work in international teams with people from different backgrounds. This made it very interesting, and it provided us with the opportunity to not only learn more about India, but also about other countries.
During this internship, I have definitely learned to be more assertive, which is a skill I can use in my future career path. I have also been able to improve both my quantitative and qualitative research skills, which comes in handy now that I am writing my thesis.
Moreover, the interns at Tata Medical Centre were from Newcastle, London, Boston, Groningen, and California. This presented me with the opportunity to improve my English, and learn more about other countries and cultures.

What pitfalls did you meet?

At Tata Medical Centre (TMC) English is commonly used and therefore we did not have any trouble communicating with doctors, nurses or other staff. However, this was different when speaking with taxi drivers, the houseboys or other people we met outside the TMC. This has left us often with miscommunication and with taxi drivers it often resulted in being charged extra.
Furthermore, when we arrived at the guesthouse we found out that there was no Wi-Fi available. Also, at the TMC all social media sites were blocked, and we could not access the Wi-Fi with our mobile phones. We were therefore not really able to contact home in the first week, which was far from ideal.

Tips for future interns

You might need some time to adjust to India, but just enjoy it and ask people around you for help. Without the help of our buddies at the TMC, the houseboys, and the interns who had already been there for a few weeks, we would have been so lost during the first few days. However, just be open to new experiences and everything will work out fine.
The best transportation to use in Kolkata is Uber. This way taxi drivers won’t be able to rip you off and it is a safe and easy way to get around. And if there are no Ubers available, then still check the fares beforehand so you know which price is fair when you start negotiating with taxi drivers.
Furthermore, take the time to travel during your internship and before or after! Because we were with eight interns, it provided us with the possibility to travel together through India during and after our internship. Also, if you ask your supervisor to get a day off because you want to go away for the weekend, then it is pretty much always fine with them because they enjoy it when you want to see more of their diverse country.
When you go out for some sightseeing, then don’t get annoyed when they want to take a picture with you. To many Indians it is quite special to see foreigners.

And lastly, try to experience as much of this country as possible! It is very diverse in every aspect. Try the local food and drinks, meet as many people as possible, and let the locals show you around, because that is when you see the most beautiful things! And the most important thing is: enjoy it and it will be an experience to never forget!